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Doug Ardoin, of the Boogie Kings, wails on his guitar at the 9th Annual Ponderosa Stomp music festival, held at the House of Blues in New Orleans on September 24, 2010.<br />
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The Boogie Kings formed in 1955 in the heart of Cajun country in Louisiana.  Their original sound is squarely in the genre of "swamp pop", music indigenous to southern Louisiana and southeast Texas that combines facets of New Orleans style rhythm and blues, country, creole zydeco, and traditional cajun music.  The genre enjoyed some mainstream success at its peak from the mid 1950s to the mid 1960s and still has many loyal enthusiasts worldwide although most practitioners are slightly older and from roughly the same time as its peak.<br />
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The band in the mid to late 1960s transformed into a bit of a "blue eyed soul" band, in keeping up with the times and achieved modest regional success.  Although the band finally quit in 1972, after many many changes to its lineup, the Boogie Kings continue to perform on a limited basis even today.<br />
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"Blue eyed soul" is a genre so named because it describes white musicians performing music originally played or in the style of black musicians, specifically those playing "soul" music or "rhythm and blues" as found on such labels as Stax and Motown.  The genre rides the very fine line between appropriation and exploitation, especially in its early years as white bands recorded what were seen as watered down versions of original black songs to more popular acclaim.  It could be argued that this process has never really stopped, up to the present day.  In any case, "blue eyed soul" is credited with expanding the audience for both soul music and rhythm and blues in general.

Doug Ardoin, of the Boogie Kings, wails on his guitar at the 9th Annual Ponderosa Stomp music festival, held at the House of Blues in New Orleans on September 24, 2010.

The Boogie Kings formed in 1955 in the heart of Cajun country in Louisiana. Their original sound is squarely in the genre of "swamp pop", music indigenous to southern Louisiana and southeast Texas that combines facets of New Orleans style rhythm and blues, country, creole zydeco, and traditional cajun...
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Stompin' 2010: Day One